How To: Screentone Shading in Blender Internal / Blender Cycles

ScreentoneComparison
Discover how to set up Screentone Shading in Blender Internal and Blender Cycles.

This is not an actual tutorial.
It’s rather an overview on how the setup works and how you can modify it according to your needs.

The shading setup for Screentone shading in Blender (both for Cycles and Blender Internal) is contained in the Sharkigator Node Collection (Download).

Screentone Shading in Cycles

ScreentoneCycles001
Fig. 1 | Full size.

Fig. 1 shows the node setup for Cycles.
The essential part is shown in at 6: The screentone texture is being subtracted by multiplying it with -1 one before connecting it to the Emission shader.
That creates the fake screentone effect.

Node setup explanations

No. 1 The Window texture coordinate is used, so it always aligns to the view.
No. 2 This value controls the size of the screentone dots. The higher the value, the smaller they get.
No. 3 This Combine XYZ node controls the aspect ratio.
If you change the aspect ratio of the camera, you’ll have to play with these values to make sure the dots aren’t squished.
No. 4 This Image Texture loads a gradient screentone texture.
You can also try other textures. (There are a bunch in the screentoneTexture-folder)
No. 5 To control the brightness falloff, you can play with this value of the Power node.
No. 6 This is where the magic happens: We feed a negative value into the Emission node.
You can also try a different strength for the Emission node.
No. 7 To get simple lighting, I used a Diffuse shader.
If you want more bounced lighting, increase its brightness (and decrease the strength of the lamps).
If you want less bounced lighting, make it darker (and increase the strength of the lamps.)
You can also try an AmbientOcclusion shader instead.

Screentone Shading in Blender Internal

ScreentoneBI001
Fig. 2 | Full size.

The screentone shader for Blender Internal is pretty straightforward:
It just uses a simple GreaterThan operation.

The lighting setup is also very important. It will mainly decide, how the result turns out.
In this case, it’s a single sun lamp (with shadows disabled) and Approximate Ambient Occlusion.

To get a good result, you also have to use a high Anti-Aliasing.

Fig. 2 shows the node setup.

Node setup explanations

No. 1 The View texture coordinate is used to get flat texturing.
No. 2 This value controls the size of the screentone dots. Higher means smaller.
No. 3 This value controls the aspect ratio of the screentone texture.
As far as I can tell, this is independent from the camera aspect ratio.
No. 4 This is a simple Blender Image Texture loading the screentone texture.
You can also try other textures. (There are a bunch in the screentoneTexture-folder)
No. 5 This color ramp controls the brightness falloff.
You can play with this color ramp, to get different results.
No. 6 This creates the actual effect.
You could add a Color>Mix>Multiply node after this to control the color.
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